Jim Meyer

Jim Meyer began making woodcuts in the early 1990s, while employed as a commercial artist. Interested in pursuing work purely of his own direction, he soon made the transition to independent printmaker, focusing on intimate, painterly studies of the American landscape. Much of his subject matter is drawn from Minnesota’s North Shore, but Jim has also produced a significant series of the West’s mountain ranges and ocean shores. A major inspiration for the artist is the Group of Seven, a group of Canadian landscape painters that were active in the early 20th century. Jim shares their affinity for intense color combinations used to define forms.

When creating a woodcut, Jim prefers basswood, poplar and cherry for carving. Wood grain and character are often retained as a part of his design. He runs anywhere from 200 editions of each single or multi-block print to 30 or so for more labor-intensive reduction prints which involve the use, alteration, and re-use of a single block. “My aim is to make art that reflects the mystery and beauty of creation,” he says. “Woodblock prints are well suited for that purpose – they are organic, low-tech, and require the patience of the skilled manual arts. Visually, they tend to be honest and strong.”

Jim lives and works in Hopkins, MN, and studied at Illinois’ Wheaton College, the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

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